TIPS FROM THE NATIONAL SKI PATROL   

Since 1938, the 501(c)3 non-profit, National Ski Patrol (NSP), has dedicated itself to providing service and safety to the outdoor community. As the preeminent authority for serving the outdoor recreation industry, NSP provides the highest quality Outdoor Emergency Care education and credentialing care to safety services providers. Ski and Snowboard Patrollers keep both you, and the mountain safe. Next time you see them on the mountain or ride with them on a chair lift, stop and talk with them. They're friendly people willing to share their knowledge of the resort with you. They can even give you some tips on great gear and where might be a good place for you to ski and ride based on your ability level. Check out these Safety Tips written to give you some snowsmarts and in collaboration with the NSP Safety Team. For more information, please visit nsp.org. 

BE SNOWSMART! PLAY IT SAFE! 

Since 1938, the National Ski Patrol has been advocating safe practices on the slopes so that skiers and snowboarders like you, can enjoy the most out of the mountain terrain. So, to share the message of how to have fun, while staying safe, NSP developed the slogan "Be Snowsmart! Play It Safe!"

What does "Be Snowsmart! Play It Safe" mean? Well, while it can mean a multitude of things depending on what situation you're in and what terrain you're on, the basis of it can be summed up in 3 key points.

1) Prepare for conditions.

Knowing what type of terrain you and your equipment can handle is extremely important when playing it safe. To be Snowsmart, know your ability level and where that appropriate terrain is on the mountain.

2) Reduce your risk of injury.

To reduce the risk of injury, always wear a helmet. Helmets can reduce your risk of head injury by 35-50%. You can avoid risk of injury in other ways too, including tuning your equipment, skiing with a friend, being aware of other skiers and riders on the slope and being aware of your surroundings and on mountain signage.

3) Prevent emergency situations.

Situations on the mountain can quickly turn into emergencies without warning. Unexpected weather changes, backcountry and side country skiing areas, and getting down the mountain with an injury are just a few factors that may turn into emergencies if you are not prepared. Preparing for situations such as these can help tremendously and can be as simple as being aware of weather forecasts, carrying a reliable communication device while on the mountain, snowboarding with a friend, and knowing how to contact Ski Patrol.

These safety tips are just part of being snowsmart! Before you even head out the door you need to have a few things lined up, like what you are going to wear and knowing how to dress for conditions outside.

Having the right equipment is important too. Borrowing is not the best idea, but renting is a great way to try different gear and see what you like before spending money on purchasing your own skis, board, boots, poles, and helmet. The National Ski Patrol highly recommends wearing a helmet while skiing or snowboarding, but encourages those participating in the sports to realize that helmets do have limitations and are not a complete answer for slope safety. Check out this helmet fact sheet from the National Ski Areas Associationto get more information on the benefits of wearing a helmet.

In addition to the proper use of helmets, the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA) has developed Your Responsiblity Code to help snow sports enthusiasts avoid injury and make their experience as safe and enjoyable as possible.

If you're adventuring in the backcountry you must be knowledgeable in avalanche safety and the equipment used to help keep you safe; NSP provides information and classes on backcountry avalanche safety.

Find out more from the National Ski Patrol.

Published in Ski

When the family takes a trip, it can be hard to leave Fido or Fluffy behind.

However, when making travel decisions, choose what is safest and most comfortable for your pet. For instance, unless you'll be able to spend a lot of time with your dog, he'll probably be happier at home than tagging along on your trip. As a rule, cats are always better off in their own home.

Published in Travel Tips

 Do you strive to raise citizens of the world? As you and your children begin to navigate the planet together, sharing your knowledge, while teaching them  to make their own way, will create confidant and compassionate travelers for the future. 

 Here are a five tips for empowering the next generation of explorers:

1. Preparation breeds confidence.

Involve your kids in the travel planning and decision making process from the earliest age possible. Show them maps, books, web sites and pictures. Stoke their curiosity by discussing the nearby and faraway places you hope to visit now or in the future. When you or other friends or family travel for business or pleasure, make a point to show your children the destinations on a map and discuss geographic and cultural points of interest that will help build their growing understanding of the world.

2. Knowledge is power.

When planning your own journey, chart a road trip using your favorite mapping technology and share the information with the kids. If they are old enough, encourage them to create a suggested routing and to offer options for stops along the way. If you will be flying, show the kids how to navigate the booking process and then check in for a flight on line. Consider making each child responsible for their own boarding pass. (For younger children perhaps printing an extra as back up is a wise decision.) Provide each child with an itinerary and discuss the details before you depart. Talk about preparing for and moving through airport security.

3. Bestow Responsibility.

Discuss your travel plans and encourage your children to create a packing list early. Talk about the importance of having the right gear for an adventure trip or the proper attire for a city visit. Then, encourage them to pack their own belongings.  As soon as possible, give them responsibility for making sure their bag makes it from home to the car, train or plane. Discuss the importance of having proper identification inside and outside of their bags and retaining baggage tags once a bag is checked to your destination. 

4. Communication is key.

Before leaving home, make sure the whole family understands how you will navigate to your destination. Visiting a city? Make sure your crew has the hotel address and phone number at hand. If you will be traveling to or through a crowded venue like an airport, a theme park or shopping mall, be sure to have a clearly defined plan should someone lose their way. Use the buddy system or rooms designated for families when visiting public restrooms.

Consider bestowing each member of the family with a cell phone and instructions for use. Should challenges occur, share your problem solving skills and solutions with the children. Without propagating fear, encourage your children to be aware of their surroundings at all times.

5. Go local.

Research your destination before departure and discuss how the places you will visit might be different or similar to your own home. Seek out tour operators and lodging options that share your travel sensibilities.

Once you arrive, burrow into the culture and make a point to learn about how and where the locals live, work and play.  Visit local farmer’s markets.

Skip the chains and seek out locally-owned eateries, shops and lodging. Seek out volunteer possibilities. If the language is not your own, learn at least a few key phrases and practice them before and during the visit.

In the end, education and experience breed understanding, acceptance and confidence.

Bon voyage!

Published in Plan

Early steps in retirement planning pay big benefits later

You may feel like retirement is a long, long, long time away. Too many people put off making decisions about how they will spend their money and  their financial future. Even if you are fresh out of high school, you can start making plans for what matters to you - travel, exploration and your retirement.  If you want your money to be there when you need it - for family vacations, a healthy retirement or pursuing new interests, you must plan ahead.

Published in Travel Tips

Considering a family cruise?

Here are ten tips to consider:

1) Know your cruise specialist:

According to a report from the

Cruise Lines International Association, 68 percent of cruise vacations

are booked through travel agents.

When researching a travel agent to book your cruise , make sure they are knowledgeable about the

cruise lines and destinations and have access to the best pricing and promotional offers such as onboard cash, spa treatments and reduced

deposits. Make sure your specialist is the right fit for you and your

vacation needs! 

Royal Caribbean

2) Book your cruise early:

The saying "the early bird catches the

worm" certainly applies to booking cruises. Booking early will provide

you with benefits such as more stateroom choices, dining options, special perks and

lower prices.

3) Be cautious about last minute deals:

While the prices may be lower with last minute deals, the room selections are not prime. You must also

remember that airfare is not included in the price of the vacation and

booking last minute airfare can be costly.

4) Carefully review the itinerary:

 If an itinerary doesn't address your needs, it may not be the right cruise for you. For example, if

someone wants to spend more time relaxing onboard, the itinerary should

include more sea days than ports-of-call. To maximize your experience in

every port, each stop should last a minimum of eight to ten hours.

5) Research the identification needed for each country:

While a passport is always needed, visa requirements may be tricky. Some countries require visas, but

others do not. To check visa requirements,

visit www.usvisaconnection.com.

6) Understand what is not included with the cruise:

When booking a family trip that includes a cruise,

vacation goers must pay the government fees. Remember to take

the price of tipping, alcoholic beverages, spa treatments, kid’s activities and shore

excursions into consideration, as they are often not included in the

overall price.

7) Be comfortable with your accommodations:

Make sure to research all of the stateroom options before making your ultimate selection.

Accommodation choices on ships include an interior room, which has no

window or natural light, an oceanview room, which has one large window

that cannot be opened, a balcony room, regular suites and a penthouse

suite. Ask about rooms that are best suited for families.

It is also important to know that the cheapest and most expensive options typically sell out first.

8) Get to know your cruise line choices:

Choosing the wrong cruise line for your family vacation is a common mistake.

Sometimes, consumers will make a decision based on their familiarity of the name without investigating the type of people that typically take vacations on that particular line.

For example, some cruise lines cater more towards families with plenty of great programming that will interest your clan, while others cater to seniors or a younger demographic. Make sure you make the right

choice for your vacation needs, suggests Geraldine Ree, Senior Vice

President of Sales and Marketing for Expedia CruiseShipCenters.

9) Take time to see the city you embark and disembark from.

When booking a cruise, people make the mistake of arriving in the city a few hours before the ship sets sail and

making flight arrangements to leave as soon as the ship docks. The embarkation and disembarkation cities are

an important part of the vacation experience and it is worthwhile for you to arrive a day before the cruise leaves

and stay for an extra day after the cruise docks. Your cruise specialist can help you plan your

sightseeing activities.

10) You don't always need the ocean for a cruise:

Consumers can book a cruise to almost any place where there is a body of water. As a matter

of fact, river cruises continue to gain in popularity as the smaller ships offer a more intimate cruising experience.

Popular destinations for river cruises include Danube (Austria),

Rhine (Germany), France and Russia.

Published in Cruise

 Are you or someone in your family planning a destination wedding?

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) suggests you carefully consider how you might pass through security with carry-ons that might include a magnificent dress, killer shoes, and just the right shade of nail polish.

Published in Family Travel Blog

 ftts  baseball-1

Going Yard, The Ultimate Guide for Major League Baseball Road Trips, provides the information you’ve been searching for about the ballparks you love and the cities that host them. When it comes to little known facts about these famous fields, author Stan Fridstein has uncovered a treasure trove. Here are a few of his gems:

Bet you didn’t know:

  1. 1. Miller Park, home of the Milwaukee Brewers, is the only ballpark that sells more sausages than hot dogs.
  2. 2. Every seat at Kauffman Stadium, in Kansas City, is blue except for a single red seat behind home plate. It was placed there to honor Buck O’ Neill, star first baseman of the Kansas City Monarchs in former Negro League. Buck viewed Royals’ games from that very location for years.
  3. 3. When you visit Target Field, new home of the Minnesota Twins, be sure to have a drink at the Town Ball Tavern, whose wood floor behind the bar is the actual surface from the Minneapolis Armory, former home of the Minneapolis Lakers before they moved to Los Angeles. family travel baseball road trips
  4. 4. If you notice anything missing when you visit the Rogers Centre in Toronto, you’re not alone. This is the only stadium without bleachers.
  5. 5. Check out the bullpens at Wrigley Field (home of the Cubs) and PNC Park (home of the Pirates). They are the only stadiums where pitchers warm up on the field of play.
  6. 6. Don’t miss the Rose Garden outside Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati. It marks the exact spot where Pete Rose’s record breaking 4192nd hit landed in the old Riverfront Stadium.
  7. 7. Babe Ruth’s adopted father owned a tavern in what is now center field at Camden Yards, home of the Baltimore Orioles.
  8. 8. The sole red seat in the right field bleachers at Fenway Park (home of the Boston Red Sox) marks the spot of the longest home run ever hit there. The 502 foot blast was crushed by Ted Williams off Detroit Tigers’ pitcher Fred Hutchinson in 1946.
  9. 9. Speaking of Fenway Park, if you take a close look at the right field scoreboard you’ll see the following letters spelled out in Morse code: TAYJRY. They are the initials of Thomas A. Yawkey and Jean R. Yawkey, the longtime Red Sox owners.
  10. 10. Every time a San Diego Padres’ player hits a home run, a fog horn is sounded. It’s an actual recording from the USS Ronald Reagan, an aircraft carrier that sits in the Port of San Diego.
  11. 11. Between building Wrigley Field in 1914 and Coors Field (Denver) in 1995, Dodger Stadium was the only National League ballpark built exclusively for baseball.
  12. 12. Talk about a rivalry: Above right center field in AT+T Park (home of the San Francisco Giants) is an actual cable car with a panel stating “No Dodger Fans Allowed.”
  13. 13. When you’re visiting Turner Field, home of the Atlanta Braves, be sure to walk across the street to the parking lot where you’ll find the original section of Fulton County Stadium’s left field wall over which Hank Aaron hit his epic 715th home run, surpassing Babe Ruth’s record.
  14. 14. As you look around Coors Field, home of the Colorado Rockies, you’ll notice that every seat is green except for a single row of purple seats in the upper deck of the ballpark. The reason: These seats are exactly one mile high!

Going Yard helps those completely consumed or only mildly interested in our national sport to optimize their travel experience. Visit every stadium and deal with issues like budgeting, logistics, securing tickets, tours, key facts and sites in each stadium and things to do in each and every city when not at the game. This is your go-to guide for baseball road trips.

You can find Going Yard here.

Published in Find Trips by Age

    

ft pg 23 incense

1. Just do it!

In addition to expanding your child’s awareness through travel, exotic family vacations inevitably strengthen family ties and create dinner conversations to last a lifetime.

2. Visit schools or sports events: Nothing helps a child understand a destination better than meeting their peers. I love to arrange school visits or visits to local community sports events. Usually the local kids are just as fascinated by my kids as my kids are by them! 

3. Don’t sweat the small stuff: Now is not the time to worry about a balanced diet or the usual house rules. It’s a vacation. Rest assured that your kids are gaining invaluable exposure, so if they eat nothing but fish sticks and French fries for two weeks and it makes them happy (yes, one of my kids did this once in Indonesia) they will come out of it no worse for the wear. 

4. Have a great guide – Part 1: Having a knowledgeable guide is like bringing a wonderful educator along with you. They can truly bring the destination to life through their stories and knowledge, making a lasting impact on young minds. Case in point: I was in Dubai and Istanbul last year with my daughter. Most people don’t think of culture or history when they think of Dubai, but we had such a wonderful and passionate guide that my daughter and I walked away with a great respect for the Emirati people and their culture. Meanwhile, we were on our own in Istanbul, a city that one normally thinks of as being filled with amazing history, but my daughter did not make the same connection there. She actually wants to move to Dubai when she is
older.

5.Have a great guide - Part 2: Yes, there is something to be said to wandering around lost in a new city, but if you are traveling with kids who can get tired, hungry and grumpy, everyone’s sanity can be saved by having a guide take you around who will not only impart knowledge, but will pick up on when little ones are tired or hungry and adjust the schedule accordingly, sometimes getting you back to the home base or nearest restaurant as quickly as possible!

6. Scheduling is everything: Don’t overdo it. Include some downtime in every day for your family to digest what they are taking in, and move at a slower pace than you would if you were on your own. It may be your first trip to China, it doesn’t have to be your last!

7. Hotel Selection: Picking the right property is critical so that when you have downtime you aren’t crammed into a tiny hotel room. Look for hotels that have a great indoor or outdoor pool, bigger rooms, or are located near parks or open areas to run around!

8. TV is a cultural exchange: A little TV viewing can give the parents a welcome break and your kids can see another aspect of the culture you are visiting. My kids still talk about familiar cartoon characters speaking in Thai and the crazy Japanese TV shows they have stumbled upon.

9. Don’t force it: If your kid doesn’t want to do something, let them have a little ownership of the situation. My 7 year old opted out of a monk cleansing in Cambodia once, and as the rest of us stood there in sarongs freezing and wet, we had to think she was the smart one.

10. HAVE FUN: That’s really the point isn’t it? Relax and enjoy and your kids will remember the trip forever.

 

Leslie Overton is a mother and the General Manager of Absolute Travel.

 

 

Published in Go Global

Being on holiday doesn’t have to be about geography. It is as much about adventure, exploration or even relaxation as it is about flight schedules, hotel rooms or miles traveled. 

So if a far-flung destination is not in the cards just now, consider putting your creative juices to work to manifest a never-to-be-forgotten memory for you and your family. And, don’t forget to take pictures. Clear the calendar and consider these five ways to savor some family time without depleting your savings:

1.Go for it.

Plan to participate in a half marathon, hike the canyon or camp in the backcountry. This is the year to research, plan and execute that idea you’ve been talking about but never had time to organize. Declare it a family affair and make the preparations part of the fun.

2. Trade houses.

Find a friend or family member in a nearby neighborhood who is willing to join in the fun. Think about it: new toys in closet, bikes in the garage, playsets in the back yard and cereal in the cupboard. (Agree up front on what is included in the deal.) Trade information about local walking paths, parks, restaurants and movie theatres. Then enjoy the new view.

 3. Make it a weekend – Part of the holiday mindset includes saying no to checking work email, or sending text messages, snap chats or posting on Instagram. If not for a week, agree to make family the focus for one whole weekend. Visit a new restaurant, go to a ballgame, take a long bike ride or play board games at home. If duty calls, let folks know your family is on vacation.

4. Focus on Free – Museums, festivals, lectures, parks, concerts and libraries are all sources of family fun where the admission is often gratis. Check local web sites and create your no-cost itinerary for the length of your “vacation”.

5. Book last minute and local – Check travel web sites for last minute deals in your home town or in a nearby city. Without air and significant gas charges, taking advantage of these down-to-the-wire deals can be worth the minimum expense. You’ll enjoy the travel treat knowing you’ve kept expenses in check. Contact: www.lastminute.com; www.travelzoo.com; www.hotwire.com.

 

Published in Plan

52 Books For Travelers of All Ages

Find a book here for the explorer or armchair traveler on your list!

 

1. Travels with Charley in Search of America: (Centennial Edition) - John Steinbeck

2. In a Sunburned Country - Bill Bryson 

3. Travels - Michael Crichton 

4. Tao of Travel - Paul Theroux 

5. Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel - Rolf Potts 

6. Gulliver’s Travels - Jonathan Swift

7. The Travels of Marco Polo (The Broadway Travellers) - L.F. Benedetto 

8. Backpacking Wyoming: From Towering Granite Peaks to Steaming Geyser Basins - Lorain Douglas

9. Halfway to Each Other: How a Year in Italy Brought Our Family Home - Susan Pohlman

10. The Road to Oxiana - Robert Byron

11. Facing the Congo - Jeffrey Taylor

12. The Size of the World - Jeff Greenwald

13. Road Fever by Tim Cahill

14. All the Wrong Places by James Fenton

15.Kite Strings of the Southern Cross

16. Nomad’s Hotel: Travels in Time and Space by Ceese Nooteboom

17. Johnny Ginger’s Last Ride by Tom Fremantle

18. The Snow Leapard by Peter Matthiessen

19. Tiger for Breakfast by Michel Peissel

20. The Ascent of Rum Doodle by W.E. Bowman

21. Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

22. The Climb by Anatoli Boukreev

23. Annapurna by Maurice Herzog

24. Hiking the Continental Divide Trail by Jennifer Hanson

25. Imagine: A Vagabond Story by Greg Lingel

26. Empty Nest to Life Vest by Christie Gorsline

27. Big Earth: 101 Amazing Adventures by Russ Malkin

28. Next Stop Grand Central by Maira Kalman

29. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die: 2nd Edition by Patricia Schultz

30. Born to Run by Christopher McDougall

31. The River of Doubt by Candice Millard

32. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

33. This is Rome (Paris, London, New York) by Miroslav Sasek

34. Turn Right at Machu Picchu by Mark Adams

35. Touching the Void by Joe Simpson

36. Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin (Just Kidding)

36. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

37. Hiking Through History by Kirk Ward Robinson

38. Life is a Trip by Judie Fein

39. Raining Cats and Rats by Donna Gottardi

40. Oh, the Thinks You Can Think by Dr. Suess

41. Sahara Unveiled: A Journey Across the Desert by William Langewiesche

42. Come Hell on High Water by Gregory Jaymes

43. The Hidden Europe by Francis Tapon

44. On the Road by Jack Kerouac

45. Coasting by Jonathan Raban

46. Venice by Jan Morris

47. In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

48. A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush by Eric Newby

49. The Journals of Captain Cook by James R. Cook and Phillip Edwards

50. The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto Che Guevara, Cintio Vitier, and Aleida Guevara

51. The Lost Girls by Jennifer Baggett, Holly C. Corbett, and Amanda Pressner

52. Seven Years In Tibet by Henry Heinrich Harrer

Published in Plan
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