Monday, 01 October 2018 19:36

Glacier Country in the Shoulder Seasons

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It’s easy to play favorites when it comes to Glacier National Park. 

Massive peaks form the backbone of this vast pristine ecosystem, in Northern Montana.  Along with her sister park across the border in Waterton Lakes, Canada, the two gems form the first international Peace Park, declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1932.  

The glacial carved terrain reveals a many-layered story of ancient seas, geologic faults and continuous uplifting. Today, receding glaciers, rivers, meadows and coniferous forests provide cover and sustenance for the wide variety of wildlife that give life to the park. Shimmering lakes and more than 700 miles of trails beckon visitors from around the world. 

She’s compelling. 

So, if you want a little extra quiet time with this favored child, make your way to Glacier country in the Spring or Fall. While you may have to appreciate some of her best attributes from afar, the peaceful nature of your visit will make it worth your while. 

Spring biking on the Going to the Sun Road

Spring   

Hike and Bike The Going To The Sun Road

Most of Glacier National Park’s two million-plus annual visitors are eager to wind their way along the impressive, 50-mile Going-to-the-Sun Road. An engineering masterpiece, the rugged road, blasted from the steep mountainside in1933, is car-free for a short, but spectacular season. (Check the Glacier National Park site for exact dates) 

For several glorious weeks, as the winter snows give way to the spring/summer melt, visitors can appreciate the iconic stretch of roadway on foot or from the seat of a bike. 

Roll or stroll along the lower flats near Lake McDonald, appreciating the subalpine forest that rises near the water’s edge.  As the season progresses, cyclists can ride the upper stretches, climbing all the way to Logan Pass at 6,683 feet without sharing the narrow roadway, or the views, with oncoming traffic.

Surrounded by snowcapped peaks against a bright blue sky, melting snowfields, and waterfalls tumbling into turquoise pools, you’ll experience Glacier’s wild interior in a way summer visitors cannot even imagine. 

Bikers can also pedal a 14-mile (one way) stretch that begins at Apgar Village. Pedal out and back while enjoying views from the southern shore of Lake McDonald. This road is open to cars but traffic is minimal. 

Strap on your hiking boots and check out one of many low elevation hikes in the Lake McDonald area as the Park transitions from a winter wonderland to the glories of Spring. Expect trickling streams giving way to flowing creeks and rivers and the slow reappearance of flowers, birds and baby animals.

Stop in to the Apgar Visitor Center to ask about day hikes, current trail conditions, and maps. 

Note that the park’s resident wildlife are waking from a long winter’s nap, so it is important to be alert, aware and carry bear spray during your outing. 

Glacier in the Fall

Fall  

Bright colors provide a glorious contrast to Montana’s Big Sky as a busy summer gives way to the quieter days of Fall. 

Hikers, bikers and road trippers can look for the colors to begin changing in mid-September on the west side of the park. On the east side, expect Mother Nature to begin the show toward the end of September and in to early October. 

The grand finale happens as the larch trees, a deciduous conifer, transform the area into a golden paradise in the middle of October.  

A road trip up the North Fork Road to the small town of Polebridge, (be sure to stop into the Polebridge Mercantile for baked goods and sandwiches). along the West side of the park, provides stunning views of the winding North Fork of the Flathead River and often snow-dusted peaks in the distance. From Polebridge, head into the Park for jaw-dropping views at Bowman Lake.  The experience of standing within this remote area of the Park, surrounded by masses of vibrant color, towering peaks and waves lapping at your feet, will stay with you forever.

Fall is also a great time for wildlife watching. The eastern side of the Park offers some of the best opportunities to glimpse both grizzly and black bear as they prepare for the long winter. Mountain goats and big horn sheep are often present and migrating birds call from overhead.

A shoulder season visit to Glacier Country isn’t for everyone.  The weather can turn on a dime. Restaurants are not bustling with vibrant activity and some services may not be available.

But for those eager to experience the spare, wild beauty of this extraordinary place on the planet, well, this is your time.

Read 100 times Last modified on Friday, 09 November 2018 13:48
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